Brickwalk

91 Tupelo

Victoria Casasco, Ernesto Buch

Brickwalk

Project Specifications

Architect:
Victoria Casasco, Ernesto Buch
Building Name:
Brickwalk
Preferred Name:
Brickwalk
Address:
91 Tupelo
Floors:
2

Architects

Victoria Casasco

Victoria Casasco

 

Like her childhood – spent in Argentina, the United States and Brazil – Victoria Casasco’s career has spanned many countries and embraced many different fields. Casasco began her career as a sculptor. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design and was a practicing artist for many years, with her work exhibited throughout New York and in Italy.

After many years spent as an artist, Casasco decided to pursue architecture. She went to Columbia University to study and in 1983 received a Masters of Architecture degree. During her graduate studies she had the opportunity to work with DPZ on the Town of Seaside. Shortly after beginning her architectural career, Casasco moved to Barcelona, Spain to conduct research on 20th century Catalan architects.  She returned to America only two years later, in 1987, and became Town Architect of Seaside, Florida – the only female town architect to date. In the same year she established her own architecture firm, CASASCOstudio.

Casasco remained in Seaside as Town Architect for a year, before moving with her firm to Santa Monica, California. Her firm works in residential, civic and commercial architecture as well as town planning. They have done work in many countries across the globe, always with an eye toward responsible design. Casasco’s continued research into building systems and materials helps them to achieve this commitment, while still focusing on the aesthetic experience of every space. Their work has been published in books and periodicals worldwide and Casasco has been recognized with many awards for her architectural efforts.

Since 1987, Victoria Casasco has also been involved in academia. She began at Mississippi State University, running a graduate studio, before moving on to California State Polytechnic University as an Assistant Professor. She taught at the Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles for nearly a decade before starting as an Assistant Professor at Yale University in 199. She still holds this post today. Over the years she has taught as a visiting professor at university of California in Los Angeles, Arizona State University and at the University of Texas. She has also lectured on architecture and urban planning throughout California and around the country.

Featured Structures:
Appell House/Roger's Lighthouse
 

Ernesto Buch

Ernesto Buch

 

The trajectory of Ernesto Buch’s nearly thirty year career in architecture and urbanism was set at a very young age. Born in Cuba and raised in Miami, Buch was introduced to many vibrant architectural heritages very early in life; these experiences led him to a lifelong love of Classical and Traditional architecture. Buch received his formal education in architecture first as an undergraduate at Case Western Reserve University, from which he earned his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture, and then at the University of Miami, where he earned his Bachelor of Architecture. He went on to Harvard University and earned his Master of Architecture in Urban Design.

Early in his career, Buch had the opportunity to go to Florida and work with Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk on the Master Plan and Urban Code for the Town of Seaside. Through this project, Buch became one of the earliest contributors to what has become the New Urbanism. While in Seaside, he not only served as its second Town Architect, but also designed several houses and civic buildings for the town – some of his first commissions as an architect. One of his most notable projects in Seaside is the Tupelo Street Pavilion; today it has become an icon of the town, symbolic of its beach atmosphere.

Buch also had the opportunity to work for Allan Greenberg, a notable classicist, as a young architect. This experience broadened his knowledge and understanding of the use of the classical language, solidifying his foundation as a classical architect. After leaving Greenberg, Buch started his own firm, Ernesto Buch Architect, Inc., in 1987. The firm’s first commission was the Richardson Library; using his time in Greenberg’s office for inspiration, Buch designed a neoclassical folly. He was awarded The Arthur Ross Award in Architecture, given by Classical America, for the design.

Today Buch is Principal Architect of his firm, which has offices in New Haven, Conneticut; Miami, Florida; and the Dominican Republic. He specializes in Classical and Traditional architecture and urbanism and has been involved in several projects in the Dominican Republic, Miami, and the Bahamas. The firm’s work has been published in various publications and has been given several awards.

Archive Inventory

Location:
Seaside Archives, University of Notre Dame
Contents:
  • Exterior Views

Exterior Views